Comparing Fractions in the Common Core

tfellers's picture

How did you learn to compare fractions? I learned to find a common denominator or change them to a decimal. Have you thought about other ways? Consider how the understanding of a unit fraction can create multiple ways for comparing fractions. The CCSS expects third grade students to understand unit fractions. Here are four possibilities:

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CGI and the Common Core: How Do They Connect?

renees's picture

Recently I attended the  Kansas Association of Teachers of Mathematics Conference. While at KATM, I presented Cognitively Guided Instruction and the Common Core: How do they Connect?  I began the discussion with background information on CGI.  Cognitively Guided Instruction is a research-based instructional strategy developed by Thomas Carpenter, Elizabeth Fennema, Linda Levi and others in the late 1980s. It was funded by the National Science Foundation and the work occurred at the University of Wisconsin at Madison. 

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Perseverance, Effort, and Success

 The last couple of weeks I have spent a good deal of time in school districts working with teachers and building leaders to improve teaching and learning.  In each instance, we have spent time discussing classroom environment.  Saying that establishing a classroom environment that supports EACH learner is really an understatement.  There are many students that are motivated to “do school” well and will “make the grade” often, in spite of our instruction.  I would venture to add that the grade in many instances is an indication of compliance not learning.  Students that a

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Motivating for Mastery: it starts with a simple question

GingerLewman's picture

So you want your students to master your class content faster? What teacher doesn't?

Here's my proposal:
Have less drill and practice (I'm looking at you, worksheet wranglers and you, test-preppers).
Instead, we will create higher personal stakes for the students and I'm not talking grades or staying after school/in from recess.

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Using the New Kansas Early Learning Standards to Make Every Moment Matter

 

by Carianne Short

 

As I look at the draft of the NEW Kansas Early Learning Standards I can’t help but notice that they are well aligned with the common core standards, provide achievable benchmarks for all students to work towards, and provide knowledge and skills that children need as they enter into Kindergarten. 

 

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Common Coring the River

Common Coring the River

By Robi Alstrom

 

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Literacy strategies and book sites for Social Studies

glennw@essdack.org's picture

Feeling a bit uneasy about how to respond to the Common Core Literacy Standards for History / Government? Struggling with what that looks like? Need a few ideas and suggestions for integrating reading and writing into your social studies instruction?

Here ya go!

Literacy Strategies & Book Sites:

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The One Thing I Want My Grandchildren’s Teachers to Know About Reading

janes's picture

The One Thing I Want My Grandchildren’s Teachers to Know About Reading

On a blustery, cool, March morning in 2005, my first grandchild, Evie, arrived.  Naturally I was elated with the prospect of cuddling, rocking, and reading to her.  Fast-forward a few years and, with the addition of three grandsons, our house tends to rock on its foundation when all four are visiting!!

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Sparking Conversations with PhotoSpark

tamarak@essdack.org's picture

Sparking conversations is something that doesn’t come naturally for everyone. In fact, as I look at my four children, several of them love to visit with others and share their thoughts, beliefs, and values openly, while others like to keep it to themselves. At the dinner table we used to ask the normal question, “How was your day?" and we would get the normal response, “Good.” Since the adoption of the common core state standards, my husband and I (both teachers) changed our approach to encourage more speaking and listening opportunities so conversations are little more lively at the dinner table! We now have each family member share what is great about his or her day and encourage other family members to ask questions relating to what was shared. We also share how we helped someone in need or an action we took that aligned with the virtue our family is studying (i.e., trustworthiness, compassion, gratitude, etc.). Now we have a new possibility for SPARKING conversations in our homes and classrooms--PhotoSpark! Staff from ESSDACK, an educational service center in Central Kansas, recently created a resource called “PhotoSpark” that can be used to spark conversations in various learning environments. Each deck includes 50 unique pictures and a card listing possible ways the photos could be used to support learning. You know what is really cool? They also support the College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards. Below are ten easy ways to implement them in the classroom to spark conversations:

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